Tag Archives: healthy foods

Quick and healthy mason jar meals for breakfast, lunch and dinner.

Three Quick & Easy Mason Jar Meals to Grab on the Go

Life’s busy. Hungry for Truth has you covered with quick and easy Mason jar meals perfect for students, working moms and farmers taking a break in the field. Prep on Sundays to grab and go throughout the week or layer in leftovers as you go. Don’t be afraid to get creative with your favorite flavors. Here are three options for breakfast, lunch and dinner to help get you started.

You may notice we couldn’t help but include a dash of dairy in all three recipes. Not only does it taste amazing, it’s also a homegrown part of a balanced diet. Did you know South Dakota is home to approximately 117,000 dairy cows that eat 31,000 tons of soybean meal each year? That’s right! Protein-rich soy delivers important nutrients that fuel healthy cows to produce the nutritious dairy foods we enjoy around the table and on the go.

Make your Mason jar meals using the recipes below and watch the video for step-by-step instructions. Looking for other easy to prep meals? Try these Cuban Sliders!

Hungry for Truth is an initiative about food and farming funded by the South Dakota soybean checkoff. The goal is to connect South Dakotans with the farmers who grow and raise their food.

Print Recipe
Three Quick & Easy Mason Jar Meals to Grab on the Go
Quick and healthy mason jar meals for breakfast, lunch and dinner.
Course Main Dish
Prep Time 10 minutes
Servings
Ingredients
Breakfast: Granola & Yogurt Parfait
  • Strawberry banana yogurt
  • Honey and almond granola
  • Blueberries
  • Raspberries
Lunch: Naked Burrito Jar
  • Pulled chicken
  • Black beans
  • Tomatoes
  • lettuce
  • shredded cheese
  • Salsa
  • sour cream
Dinner: Classic Chili and Cornbread
  • Leftover chili
  • Corn bread muffin chunks
  • shredded cheese
  • sour cream
  • Parsley
Course Main Dish
Prep Time 10 minutes
Servings
Ingredients
Breakfast: Granola & Yogurt Parfait
  • Strawberry banana yogurt
  • Honey and almond granola
  • Blueberries
  • Raspberries
Lunch: Naked Burrito Jar
  • Pulled chicken
  • Black beans
  • Tomatoes
  • lettuce
  • shredded cheese
  • Salsa
  • sour cream
Dinner: Classic Chili and Cornbread
  • Leftover chili
  • Corn bread muffin chunks
  • shredded cheese
  • sour cream
  • Parsley
Quick and healthy mason jar meals for breakfast, lunch and dinner.
Instructions
  1. Layer ingredients into Mason jar.
  2. Seal with lid
  3. Enjoy!
Hungry For Truth Edamame Soy Super Food Facts

Edamame: A Soy Superfood

It makes a great appetizer when you’re out for sushi or a nutrient-packed salad topper, but what exactly is edamame? Technically, it’s a type of soybean, but not the same kind you see growing in your neighbor’s fields.

Protein Packaged in a Pod

Edamame is a specialty breed of soybean harvested while the plant is young and the beans are soft. It originated in China but is known today as a traditional Japanese vegetable. While edamame may look like your average snap pea, they aren’t eaten or grown like one. The beans of edamame are edible, but the pods are discarded. To eat edamame, you can simply steam them whole and pop them straight from the pod to your mouth or use shelled edamame like green peas or lima beans in any recipe.

The sweet, nutty-tasting beans provide a powerful punch of protein: 18 grams per cup! That little cup also contains 8 grams of fiber and vitamins such as calcium and iron, all in only 188 calories.

Not Your Neighbor’s Soybean

While edamame is a type of soybean, they’re not what you see when driving through South Dakota fields. Our farmers are pros at growing field-grade soybeans used for things like animal feed and biodiesel, an environmentally friendly fuel. These are different than food-grade soybeans, which have higher protein content and are meticulously managed and inspected throughout their life. Edamame is an even more specific type that has been selected over time for flavor, seed size and digestibility. While you may not see edamame grown in the Upper Midwest, you can find other food-grade soybeans used to make tofu and soy milk in the fields of North Dakota and Minnesota.

Four Ways to Eat Edamame

New to the edamame game? Here are four ways to harness the superfood’s health benefits in your own kitchen:

  1. Add salt: Buy fresh or frozen edamame pods, add some salt to a large pot of water and boil them for 3 to 5 minutes, or until they’re bright green. Drain the water, sprinkle with more salt to taste and squeeze them out of the pod as you snack.
  2. Toss in stir fry: Add edamame beans to your stir fry for additional protein and enhanced flavor.
  3. Puree into dip: Puree edamame into delicious, healthy dips with a hummus-like texture. Give it a try with this recipe.
  4. Top off salad: Add satisfying texture to your next salad with edamame beans.

Learn more about the health benefits of soy from dietitian Teresa Blauwet. Then put your new edamame expertise to use by trying this linguini recipe.

Hungry for Truth is an initiative about food and farming funded by the South Dakota soybean checkoff. The goal is to connect South Dakotans with the farmers who grow and raise their food.

 

From 4-H Project to Farmers Market: The Story of Hebda Farms

For many in Sioux Falls, the average Saturday starts with a cup of coffee and a walk down to the local farmers market around 8 a.m. For local farmer Dale Hebda of Hebda Farms, preparing his stand at the market starts at 5:30 a.m. on Friday morning.

“We start with picking produce and packing it up for Saturday morning,” Dale said. “We usually finish Friday by packing our cooler with our baked goods at 11 p.m.”

Long hours are just part of the job at Hebda Farms, a produce farm in Mission Hills that started off as a 4-H project for Dale’s oldest son, Steven.

“He began with two or three acres that supplied our stand at the little farmers market in Yankton,” he said. “He bought the seed, paid for the water and paid me rent. He really took care of his finances and ran an excellent business.”

In addition to Steven’s efforts and purple ribbons accrued at the county fair, the community also provided the support Hebda Farms needed.

“Our community really came together and rallied around him to support his local business at our farmers market,” Dale said. “With Steven’s proven success and our seven younger children coming into 4-H down the road, we needed to expand our business.”

As luck would have it, a property came up for sale just as the Hebda family considered expansion. They purchased the land and went from two to three acres to 45 acres and have been growing ever since. In addition to adding products and produce to their line, they also began growing soybeans, corn and alfalfa on an annual rotation.

“We rotate crops yearly for weed control, as some weeds are more prevalent in some crops than others,” he said. “Some of the harvested crops are sold, and some are kept to feed the cattle we raise for our family.”

Introducing new products and produce is a regular occurrence for the Hebdas. Dale said they test them for about two to three years to see if they’re viable, then decide if they’ll continue growing them in future seasons. Hebda Farms also now has a commercial kitchen for pickling and canning their 36 varieties of jellies and creating delicious baked goods from scratch.

“We have about six to seven varieties of pies,” said Dale. “Our Latino workers have contributed their family recipes, so we now sell flan and other traditional Mexican foods.”

Even though there are challenges in owning a small businesses and farming, Dale enjoys growing food and connecting with South Dakota families.

“It is a fun time. At the end of the day, I don’t necessarily get satisfaction from the revenue,” he said. “I’m happy when I see happy customers leaving our farm or stand with healthy and fresh food for their families.”

You can visit Dale and the Hebda crew on Saturday and Sunday mornings at Lewis and Clark Lake in Yankton, Saturday mornings in Sioux Falls and by appointment at their farm in Mission Hills.

 

Farmers markets are a great place to meet with the people who grow your food. If you can’t make it out to a farmers market, ask a question in the comments, or check out our blogs below to learn more about connecting with local farmers:

Six Things You Probably Didn’t Know About Farmers Markets

Buying Local is Easier Than You Think

Farm-to-Fork Dinner Connects South Dakotans Through Conversations and Local Foods