Tag Archives: gmo

Kevin Deinert Farm Hungry for Truth

How One Young Farmer Preserves the Land for the Next Generation

For Kevin Deinert, farming is all about family. The 30-year-old farmer grows 2,500 acres of soybeans, corn and alfalfa, and raises beef cattle alongside his dad and brother on their family farm in Mount Vernon.

Hungry for Truth Kevin Deinert Farm

“I went into agriculture because I wanted to keep up our family legacy,” Kevin said. “I now farm the land I was raised on and enjoy playing a small part in feeding and leading my community.”

Hungry for Truth Kevin Deinert Farm

Kevin was recently chosen to serve on the South Dakota Soybean Association board as part of a national young farmer-leader program. The group encourages young farmers to take on leadership roles in their communities while empowering them with the tools they need to have conversations about today’s farming practices with their neighbors.

Hungry for Truth Kevin Deinert Farm

One topic many people find interesting is how and why farmers use pesticides. Farmers use pesticides to protect against the weeds, insects or plant diseases that might threaten the safety and quality of their crop. Farmers like Kevin can leverage technology to understand exactly what pesticides to use in his fields and in what amounts.

Hungry for Truth Kevin Deinert Farm

“We’re not spraying more than we need. We formulate a specific recipe for each field and apply no more, no less,” he said. “Some people might not know that farmers have to be licensed to buy pesticides and must take classes to ensure they’re using the products correctly.”

Hungry for Truth Kevin Deinert Farm

Using pesticides correctly means using very little product. It takes about a coffee cup’s worth diluted in water to cover an entire acre, which is about the size of a football field. Many soybean farmers have also reduced their pesticide use by using seeds that are genetically modified to protect against harmful insects. GMO soybeans have reduced pesticide use by 37 percent, according to the American Council on Science and Health.

Hungry for Truth Kevin Deinert Farm

The Deinerts also believe that taking care of the soil can help stop problems before they start. Kevin and his family practice no-till farming and use cover crops to enrich the soil and make sure they’re growing quality crops from the get-go.

Hungry for Truth Kevin Deinert Farm

“I farm with my brother and my dad. The decisions we make affect our family and community,” Kevin said. “So I hope people know that when we make decisions for our farm, we think about their families as well. We’re out there to do good for everyone and grow safe food that everyone can enjoy.”

Hungry for Truth Kevin Deinert Farm

For Kevin, a newlywed, being a good steward of the land is about much more than growing great food. Sustainability means continuously improving the land, leaving it better than it was when he found it.

Hungry for Truth Kevin Deinert Farm

“Farming is not just a year-to-year deal. We look many years down the road,” he said. “We’re trying to preserve our land for years to come so that we can pass it on to our children and their children after that.”

Curious about how farmers like Kevin safely apply pesticides? Get the scoop on plant protection from another South Dakota family farm.

Hungry for Truth is an initiative about food and farming funded by the South Dakota soybean checkoff. The goal is to connect South Dakotans with the farmers who grow and raise their food.

 

Matt Bainbridge Hungry for Truth Planting SD

Next Gen Farmer Shares Steps For Sustainable Planting

Farmer Matt Bainbridge tries to make each planting season better than the last. This means growing healthier crops, higher yields and improving his farm practices to take care of the environment for future generations. It’s a tall order, but he has technology and farm data on his side.

“On our farm, we have access to online data from farms across the country and track everything we do on our own land. It helps us be more efficient with seed, crop nutrients and pesticides. We can manage a large piece of land like it’s small,” said Matt.

Farmer Matt Bainbridge

While Matt and his family use several sustainable practices to grow crops and raise cattle, today he’s focused on planting.

“We plant about 150 acres in a day, driving at a speed of 5 miles per hour. It’s important we take our time to make sure it’s done perfectly. Planting and caring for crops is something we only get to do about 50 times in our lives. We want to get it right.”

Let’s explore the steps he uses to make each growing season more sustainable.

1. Review field data. The first step is looking at the data from the last harvest. Thanks to precision technology, Matt knows exactly how well crops grew in each field. He can tell which seeds did well, which ones didn’t and what factors may have contributed to the results. He uses this information to inform his seed selections for the next growing season.

Farmer Matt Bainbridge uses computer software to help him prepare for planting season.

2. Select high-performing seeds. Next, he chooses seeds he thinks will work best for his farm. Matt grows soybeans, corn, wheat, alfalfa and forage crops for cattle, which means planting a combination of GMO and non-GMO seeds. Matt chooses seeds based on the data from his own fields, what he’s seen growing in other fields around him and information he’s found online. He typically purchases seed in December.

Bainbridge uses a GPS system that helps guide his planter in the field.

3. Load field maps. As spring approaches, Matt works with a local expert to digitally map out each field. This helps him plant the right amount of seeds and apply the right amount of crop nutrients for optimal growth based on the soil type. Soils that are light and rocky get fewer seeds, while black, heavy soils receive more. The maps help the planter limit waste and improve efficiency.

4. Set up planter. Before heading out into the field, Matt makes sure the soil map software syncs with the GPS system guiding the planter. The software and hardware need to communicate so seeds are planted in straight rows with the right spacing at a precise depth.

Matt Bainbridge Hungry for Truth planting

5. Check seed placement and depth. Once he gets out into the field, Matt periodically checks to make sure everything is working properly. How? Good old-fashioned digging in the dirt. For the first few hours each day, he physically gets out of the planter and digs near the freshly planted seeds to ensure everything is happening as it should. Sometimes the way his grandparents did it is still the best.

Interested in learning more about precision technology? Read this blog that compares Fitbits and farming.

Hungry for Truth SD Top Similarities Between Organic and Conventional Farming

Top Similarities Between Organic and Conventional Farming

There are a lot of choices when it comes to food in South Dakota grocery stores and farmers markets. “Low fat,” “gluten free” and “non-GMO” are just a few of the labels companies add to packaging to stand out and appeal to your dietary preferences. While they may be helpful, these labels can also lead people to wonder about the safety and health of foods without labeling claims.

“Organic” is a great example of this because foods grown using organic and conventional practices are equally safe and nutritious, but organic foods receive a little extra attention. That’s because organic farmers go through a certification process that requires them to use some different practices. However, you may be surprised to know that conventional and organic farmers are more alike than you think.

In the past, we’ve explored ways organic farming is different than conventional, so today we’re looking at some of the top similarities.

 

Hungry for Truth SD Top Similarities Between Organic and Conventional Farming

Families own and operate 97 percent of the farms in South Dakota. There are approximately 31,000 farms in the state and about 103 are certified organic. Whether they use organic or conventional methods, there’s almost always a family behind the food you eat.

 

Hungry for Truth SD Top Similarities Between Organic and Conventional Farming

Conventional and organic farmers can both use pesticides to control harmful insects. The difference is that organic farmers can’t use most synthetic substances, while conventional farmers can use any type of pesticide deemed safe by the USDA. No matter what they use, by the time the food reaches grocery store shelves, it’s safe to eat. In fact, a woman could eat 850 servings of apples in a day with no effects from pesticides. See for yourself.

 

Hungry for Truth SD Top Similarities Between Organic and Conventional Farming

Farmers who use conventional and organic methods seek ways to improve their farm practices each year to protect the land for future generations. Environmentally friendly practices like crop rotation, no-till farming and cover crops protect and preserve the land, and aid in improving soil quality. Composting and applying animal manure also fertilize the ground.

 


Organic and conventional farmers who raise animals care about their safety and want to keep them healthy and comfortable. They protect them by providing shelter in barns, making sure they have access to water and feeding them a healthy diet of soybeans, corn and vitamins. Soybeans – grown organically or conventionally – are a favorite protein-packed meal for pigs, chickens, turkeys and cows in South Dakota. Farmers work with veterinarians to treat sick animals. Though organic farmers cannot use antibiotics to treat them like conventional farmers, they can use some vaccines and pain medications.

 

Hungry for Truth SD Top Similarities Between Organic and Conventional Farming

Foods raised organically and conventionally must meet safety standards set by the USDA. South Dakota farmers grow and raise foods that are healthy for your family and theirs. The methods may be different, but safety is a top priority for all family farmers.

 

The next time you’re in the grocery store trying to decide between the organic and conventionally raised strawberries, you can feel confident you’re making a safe and healthy choice no matter which carton you pick. Keep growing your food-shopping knowledge by reading about meaningless food labels and if paying a little more for organic is worth it.

Hungry for Truth Seed Sustainability

Exploring Seed Sustainability

Just like you have choices when it comes to the food you buy in the grocery store, farmers have choices when it comes to the seeds they plant. There’s a reason why many of today’s corn, soybean and even some apple farmers choose to plant genetically modified seeds. They help farmers grow food safely and efficiently.

No matter what farmers choose – GMO or non-GMO – you can feel good knowing the seeds farmers plant to grow your food are safe. Many also have a sustainable story to tell. Let’s explore the technology.

Hungry for Truth Seed Sustainability

More than 90 percent of all soybeans are genetically modified for herbicide resistance. Herbicides are a type of chemical that protects the soybean plants from weeds. Herbicide-tolerant soybean seeds allow farmers to apply pesticides early in the growing season without damaging the plants. In case you’re wondering, farmers typically mix about one medium coffee cup’s worth of pesticide with water and mist across an acre of land, which is about the size of a football field.

This seed technology also helps keep the soil healthy by reducing the need for tillage. Tilling soil in a field or garden helps keep weeds at bay, but too much can damage the soil. Taking care of soil is an important part of managing a sustainable family farm.

Hungry for Truth Seed Sustainability

Did you know approximately 45 percent of fruits and vegetables are tossed for damage on their way to the kitchen table? The technology in Arctic® apple seeds helps them resist browning and bruising, which can help us all cut down on food waste. While South Dakota farmers don’t plant these apple seeds yet, the technology is on its way to produce shelves near you.

It’s amazing to think that pre-sliced apples will look and taste yummy days after opening the bag. This is seed technology that brings sustainability from the farm to your table.

Hungry for Truth Seed Sustainability

We all know the weather in South Dakota is unpredictable. Lack of rain may turn your lawn brown, but for family farmers it can severely damage whole fields of crops. That’s why some corn seeds have built in technology to grow with less water. By tolerating drought conditions, farmers can grow a healthy and safe corn crop that allows them to invest in more sustainable improvements for their farms.  

Did you know so much sustainability existed in seeds? Be sure to share what you’ve learned around your dinner table. Find out more about why local farmers choose to plant GMO seeds.

Farm Sustainability Hungry for Truth South Dakota

The Truth Behind Five Farm Sustainability Myths

Being environmentally friendly is an important part of today’s family farms. Thanks to advancements in technology, adoption of conservation tillage and other factors, more than 90 percent of U.S. soybeans are grown sustainably. Most South Dakota families may not realize how much farmers focus on making improvements to care for the land and water, while growing healthy food, because it happens behind the scenes.

Think you know the truth about farms and sustainability? Test your knowledge below with five common myths and the truth behind them.

 

Myth: Farmers are becoming less sustainable.

Farm Sustainability Hungry for Truth South Dakota

TRUTH
Au contraire, farmers are becoming more sustainable. The U.S. Farmers and Ranchers Alliance estimates soybean farmers today are growing nearly 50 percent more soybeans now than just 30 years ago with a third of the water and energy and just under half the land. They’ve also cut greenhouse gas production and soil loss by nearly half.

 

Myth: Only small, organic farms are sustainable.

Farm Sustainability Hungry for Truth South Dakota

TRUTH
When it comes to sustainability, size really doesn’t matter. It’s all about making smart choices for the land and water. For example, the tillage that some organic and conventional farmers do to avoid using pesticides and create a good seedbed can disrupt soil health. Reducing tillage is something family farms of all sizes and practices can do to be more environmentally-friendly.

 

Myth: GMOs are not sustainable.

Farm Sustainability Hungry for Truth South Dakota

TRUTH
GMO seeds allow farmers to grow safe crops that are more resistant to certain pests, diseases and environmental conditions than plants grown from traditional seeds. Because GMO crops are better at defending themselves, farmers can use fewer pesticides. The American Council on Science and Health estimates GMO soybeans have helped reduce pesticide use by 37 percent.

 

Myth: Pesticides are not sustainable.

Farm Sustainability Hungry for Truth South Dakota

TRUTH
Pesticides are used by many farmers, organic and conventional alike. When used responsibly, they help protect crops from devastating pests. South Dakota soybean farmers must be educated and certified to mix and apply pesticides. They also use technology and equipment to ensure they’re using just the right amount to get the job done.

 

Myth: Sustainability is about choosing the environment over people.

TRUTH
Sustainability is all about making the right environmental choices now so families continue to enjoy safe and healthy food in the future. It’s choosing the environment and people. For South Dakota farmers, families are the key reason to protect the land and water for the future.

So how did your knowledge stack up against the facts? Let us know by leaving a comment below. Continue learning how South Dakota farmers go green by reading this story about a farmer near Colton.

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Millennial Farmer Goes High-Tech for Sustainability

A new crop of farmers is growing in South Dakota. These millennials are leveraging data and adopting technology to make their operations more sustainable for the future. The great news is they aren’t the only ones going high-tech for the environment! Many South Dakota farm families use practices that  protect natural resources while growing safe and healthy food.

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Morgan Holler is a millennial farmer from Pierpont who’s the fifth generation to run the family farm with help from his wife, Heather, and their three daughters. For Morgan, implementing environmentally friendly farming practices means being a good neighbor and doing the right thing to feed his family and yours.

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“My older daughters love riding in the tractor and the combine. I love seeing their eyes light up when they walk the fields they ‘planted’ and can’t help but stop and think about what it will be like to farm with them one day,” Morgan said. “That lays in my hands. If we don’t practice sustainable farming, we’re not only hurting the land but also ourselves.”

The 29-year-old South Dakota State University grad puts his agronomy degree to work every day. Morgan always looks for ways to use less pesticides, fertilizers and other products, while growing healthy soybeans and corn.

Technology is a big help. Morgan uses data to determine precisely where and when to apply pesticides, plant seeds and even the types of seeds to use. The technology in equipment like tractors and sprayers ensures it’s done in the right amounts so nothing is wasted. That’s important when you grow a lot of crops.

hungry for truth gmo sustainability young farmer practices family farms agriculture

Another sustainable practice the Hollers have implemented is minimum tillage. After they harvest their crop, they leave the plant stalks in the field to help enrich the soil. This reduces soil erosion and keeps the soil healthy for years to come.

Though Morgan knows technology helps him take better care of the land, that message doesn’t always make it to grocery stores and dinner tables. He works with a young man who recently moved to South Dakota from California to learn about agriculture.

“He’s been full of questions, which I love. He said he never realized how much thought I put into each seed,” Morgan said. “It’s been fun showing him the technology we use to feed our friends and neighbors while taking care of the land.”

hungry for truth gmo sustainability young farmer practices family farms agriculture

Morgan and other young farmers buck the stereotype of lazy, self-obsessed millennials.

“I love coming to work every day,” he said. “Feeding people is such a rewarding way to provide for my own family. I’m proud of that.”

Want to learn more about how farmers use technology? This Hungry for Truth blog explores how farmers use data to make their family farmers more earth friendly.

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Carrot Seed Kitchen Connects Brookings Community With Local Foods

There’s no doubt that many South Dakota families have questions about how their food is grown and raised. They know what it looks like on grocery store shelves, but aren’t necessarily familiar with where it came from and want to know more. Kirsten Gjesdal, owner of Carrot Seed Kitchen, has witnessed the disconnect firsthand when visitors to her store thought an ornamental pepper plant was a carrot plant.

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“I received the plant as a gift from a friend, who put a carrot seed card into the plant to honor the name of the store,” she said. “I am shocked to see how many people ask if that is actually how carrots grow.”

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The Carrot Seed Connection

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Hungry for Truth helps facilitate genuine connections between South Dakotans and farmers who grow our food, and Kirsten also shares that same passion. She opened Carrot Seed Kitchen two years ago to help people in Brookings connect with what they eat through quality kitchenware. She spent the previous two years working as an event planner and was tired of sitting at a desk planning meals for corporate functions.

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“I wanted to be involved in the community, working one-on-one with cooks and foodies,” Kirsten explained. “I started off selling cooking items, but always dreamed of expanding one day to include food,” she said. “I just wasn’t sure how to do it.”

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Food And Farmers

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After introducing the “Follow Your Food” event series to help customers learn more about how local food is grown and raised, she realized just how passionate the people of Brookings were about connecting with the farmers.

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“Our pizza night event was a crowd favorite. Everyone made their own pizza and chatted with the farmers about what it takes to grow produce,” Kirsten said. She enjoys learning about what happens on today’s farms and sharing that experience with others in the community.

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When she attended our Farm-to-Fork Dinner in June, it was the first time she’d been on a farm with animals. She learned about cow comfort and how they eat a healthy, balanced diet including soybean meal, silage and corn. She also had the opportunity to ask the farmers directly about the processes on their farms.

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“It’s so nice to meet the real, actual farmers who raise the animals. They were so open to talking about what they do and why they do it,” said Kirsten. “Many people don’t think about the connection crops like soybeans have with the food we eat. I had no idea South Dakota farmers harvest about 250 million bushels of soybeans each year! Those soybeans go on to feed chickens that lay eggs, cows that give us milk and cheese and of course bacon and pork chops from pigs.”

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Expanding the Kitchen

hungry for truth south dakota small business gmo non gmo farm to fork conventional organic agriculture practices soybean carrot seed kitchen brookings kirsten gjesdal kitchenware locally grown locally raised

When the opportunity came to buy the space next door and expand Carrot Seed Kitchen to include local foods, she jumped at it. Now the store includes a large area featuring milk, cheeses, butter and ice cream from Stensland Family Farms, as well as local meats and produce from the Dakota Fresh Food Hub.

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She’s already planning for further growth to support other small businesses by adding an incubator kitchen and opening it up to entrepreneurs who need extra cooking space and a place to sell their products. Kirsten hopes Carrot Seed Kitchen can help others succeed.

hungry for truth south dakota small business gmo non gmo farm to fork conventional organic agriculture practices soybean carrot seed kitchen brookings kirsten gjesdal kitchenware locally grown locally raised

“I needed something I could really be proud of that adds value to my life and the lives of others,” she said. “I’m so lucky. I get to help people connect with their food and learn more about where it comes from through my store.”

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Create a farm-to-fork journey in your kitchen by reading these farm stories and making their favorite recipes:

Farmer Paul’s Chicken Kabobs

Growing More With Less on a South Dakota Family Farm + Bacon Wrapped Asparagus

Homemade Cast Iron Skillet Pizza

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Sip + Savor Serves Up Local Foods with Farmers + Make Miner Beer Mac and Cheese

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Hungry for Truth and local farmers hosted more than 60 women business owners from the Sioux Falls community at Prairie Berry East Bank in September for an elegant evening filled with food and conversations. Guests were invited to Sip + Savor beverages from Miner Brewing Co. and Prairie Berry as well as craft beer infused creations such as Miner Brewing Mac and Cheese and cupcakes from Oh My Cupcakes!

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Farmers Morgan Kontz and Jerry Schmitz welcomed everyone and shared stories about their farms, including plans for soybean harvest. Morgan explained how family farms of all sizes contribute to the local food supply and use practices to ensure safe and healthy choices for families.

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“Buying food from local farmers is a great way to support our community,” said Morgan. “Sometimes you’re buying local and you don’t even know it. The beef from my farm is sold in grocery stores, but it doesn’t have a local label.”

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Farmers Jeff Thompson and Dawn Scheier also mingled with guests, answering questions about everything from the safety of GMOs and pesticides, to the truth behind food labels and even the surprising connection between South Dakota soybeans and Whole Foods.

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Prairie Aquatech in Brookings sources soybean meal to create its fish food from South Dakota Soybean Processors in St. Lawrence,” Jeff said. “The fish food is sold to a fish farm in Wisconsin that raises trout for Whole Foods. It’s an unexpected farm-to-fork connection that was fun to share with our guests.”

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Hungry for Truth hosts gatherings like these to help South Dakotans better understand how food is grown and raised on local farms. You can bring the flavor of Sip + Savor to your kitchen with this recipe for Miner Beer Mac and Cheese. We suggest using Dimock Dairy cheese. Get the scoop on how it’s made by reading this. Then let us know how this recipe turns out in the comments below.

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Print Recipe
Miner Beer Mac & Cheese
By Chef Mark of Prairie Berry East Bank
hungry for truth south dakota gmo non gmo organic conventional friend a farmer farming practices quick easy recipe beer mac and cheese miner brewery sioux falls healthy recipes sip and savor event food event planning ideas
Course Main Dish
Servings
people
Ingredients
For the macaroni
  • 1 pound pasta
  • 5 quarts salted water
For the cheese
  • 1/2 cup all-purpose flour
  • 5 oz Butter
  • 1-1/2 cups Heavy Cream
  • 1 cup Miner Brewing craft beer Recommended: Stout
  • 3 cups shreadded white cheddar cheese
  • 1 cup shredded Montery Jack or colby jack cheese
  • 1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • 1/2 cup panko bread crumbs
Course Main Dish
Servings
people
Ingredients
For the macaroni
  • 1 pound pasta
  • 5 quarts salted water
For the cheese
  • 1/2 cup all-purpose flour
  • 5 oz Butter
  • 1-1/2 cups Heavy Cream
  • 1 cup Miner Brewing craft beer Recommended: Stout
  • 3 cups shreadded white cheddar cheese
  • 1 cup shredded Montery Jack or colby jack cheese
  • 1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • 1/2 cup panko bread crumbs
hungry for truth south dakota gmo non gmo organic conventional friend a farmer farming practices quick easy recipe beer mac and cheese miner brewery sioux falls healthy recipes sip and savor event food event planning ideas
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees.
  2. In a large pot, place 5 quarts of water and add 2 tablespoons salt. Bring to a boil and add dry pasta. Cook on high, uncovered, stirring occasionally for 10 minutes or until noodles become al dente. Strain and set aside in a large mixing bowl. Lightly oil, if needed, so noodles do not clump together.
  3. To assemble the beer cheese, melt butter on low in a large sauce pot. Using a whisk, add the flour and combine with the melted butter. This is called a roux.
  4. Add the heavy cream to the roux and whisk until the sauce begins to thicken and just reaches a low simmer. This is called a béchamel.
  5. Now add the Miner Beer to the béchamel. This will thin it and create bubbles. Continue to whisk on low until the bubbles are gone and it’s warm.
  6. Add the 3 cups of shredded white cheddar cheese and whisk until the cheese has melted.
  7. Remove from the heat and add all the beer cheese to the cooked noodles. Mix to coat, then add the remaining 1 cup of shredded jack cheese and mix.
  8. Place this into a casserole dish. Mix the panko with the grated Parmesan and spread evenly over the cheesy pasta.
  9. Bake at 325 degrees for about 12 minutes. Enjoy!
hungry for truth South Dakota farming agriculture ag soybean farmer gmo non gmo organic conventional production practices family farm families

Get to Know the Farmers Behind the Hungry for Truth Billboards

You may be surprised to know that the farmers you see on Hungry for Truth billboards along South Dakota roads aren’t models. They’re real local farmers. Some have farmed their whole lives and others recently discovered a love of the land. All of them are committed to growing safe and healthy food for your family.

We thought we’d take you behind the scenes to learn more about the farms behind those friendly faces and why they’re involved with Hungry for Truth.

Morgan and Jason Kontz

Though she was not a farmer, Morgan met Jason online through farmersonly.com when she was a student at Purdue University in Indiana and he was farming in Colman, South Dakota. After getting to know each other through phone calls and online chats, they finally met in the summer of 2008. Morgan had car trouble on the drive out so she arrived later than expected. Within minutes of meeting Jason for the first time, she also met most of his family at a reunion.

That might’ve scared off some women, but not Morgan. She loved his family and the wide-open spaces for adventure on his farm. Soon, she transferred to South Dakota State University and one year after that first in-person date, they married. Today, they have two children who all work together to grow food on the farm.

“Until I moved to the farm, I had no idea just how much effort goes into making sure the food we grow and the practices we use on the farm are safe,” said Morgan who also blogs about her experiences. “Being involved in Hungry for Truth gives me the opportunity to talk with other moms about how we make safety a top priority for our kids and theirs.”

John and Dane Horter

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John and Dane Horter are a father/son duo who enjoy growing food for South Dakota families near Andover. Dane may be young, but he already knows and loves the ins and outs of farm life. He feeds cows and helps during calving. He rides along in the tractor during planting and in the combine during harvest. He’s even become a budding newscaster, giving crop reports from the field, sharing what he’s learned about the safety of GMO seeds, the latest farm technology and how to care for animals from his dad.

It may seem like a lot of responsibility, but that’s part of being the sixth generation to continue the family legacy. Learning from the past and improving practices for the future are important for feeding their friends and neighbors.

“Hungry for Truth is a way for me to share our farm story,” said John. “Farming today looks much different than when my grandpa farmed, and it’s going to change even more by the time Dane grows up. We want South Dakotans to know how food is grown and raised, and that we make choices every day to become more sustainable so all of our families have a bright future.”

Monica and Mike McCranie

Monica McCranie is another city gal who moved from Denver, Colorado to South Dakota to build a life on the farm with her husband Mike. For more than 30 years, they’ve worked side by side in Claremont to grow soybeans, corn and raise two sons. They are also well-traveled and love learning about agricultural practices in different parts of the world. All this experience translates into confidence in the grocery store when Monica selects foods to feed their family. Understanding labels is key.

“As a consumer and a mom, I understand how confusing it is to look at a label and understand what it does and doesn’t mean,” Monica said. “What is important to know is that, no matter what the label says, whether that food was grown conventionally or organically, whether it’s a GMO or not, it has the same nutritional value.”

Monica and Mike believe there’s a lot of great information to share about food labels and what they mean to help moms make the right choices for their families. Hungry for Truth is one way they can reach across the table and have those conversations.

Get to know more about the farmers who grow and raise your food by reading these stories. Or if you have a question for any of our farmers, let us know.

A Look at High-Tech Animal Care

Keeping South Dakota Waters Clean is Good for Summer Fun and Farming

Let’s Get Growing! Planting Q&A With a Farmer and a Gardener

hungry for truth sd South Dakota farming agriculture gmo non gmo recipes easy chicken kabobs tasty family activities outdoor family activities outdoor movie night how to

How to Host an Outdoor Movie Night + Greek Chicken Kabobs

Whether it’s date night at the theater or a cozy family night on the couch, movies have a way of bringing us together. When it’s warm in South Dakota, it can be fun to take the movie magic outdoors and gather under the stars. Here are our tips for planning a night that’s sure to please family and friends.

Hungry for Truth Outdoor Movie Night

 

Easy Essentials

A projector, audio speakers and computer are essential technology. A free projector might be tough to track down, but they are available at most rental companies and easy to purchase. Need a portable screen? No worries. Just hang a white sheet or painter’s drop cloth. You could also skip it and project onto the side of a building if it’s clean and light colored. Don’t forget extension cords.

Sunset Savvy

Pay attention to sunset and plan your festivities accordingly. You want to start the movie when it’s dark, so this could be 9 p.m. or 7:30 p.m., depending on the time of year. Starting later gives you time to host dinner and play yard games. Starting early may mean you can squeeze in two movies; family-friendly first for the kiddos and then one for the adults after they go to bed.

Comfy and Cozy

Keep your audience comfy by providing blankets and pillows for lounging or ask them to bring their own. Hang bistro lights to set the mood, segment food from the theater seating and make sure your guests can see where they’re going. Set out mosquito repellent spray and fire up citronella candles to protect your guests against bugs and other pests.

Snack Stylishly  

The best part of any movie night is the food. Snack stylishly by creating a buffet table out of pallets or cement blocks and plywood. Cover with a cute tablecloth and add a flower centerpiece for a touch of greenery.

When it comes to the menu, keep it simple. Finger foods like kabobs or meats and cheeses paired with crackers work well for flexible dining. A popcorn bar with butter and assorted toppings transforms the traditional snack into a bold, salty or tangy mix. If you’re in the mood for something sweet, a selection of classic movie candies or toasty s’mores are two of our favorites. In fact, we have the perfect recipe for campfire ice cream s’mores.

No matter what’s on the menu, South Dakota soybean farmers have you covered. Pigs, cows, chickens and turkeys love to eat protein-packed soybeans as part of a balanced diet. Healthy animals mean you’re serving up quality milk, eggs, cheese and meats for your guests.

Movie Magic

Select your movie based on your guest list. The classics or a comedy are always a great bet. Depending on who’s there, it might be “Grease,” “8 Seconds” or “The Goonies.” When it comes to kids, you can’t go wrong with anything Pixar or Disney. “Jurassic Park” or “Jaws” might be fun if you’re feeling adventurous, but watch out. Your backyard may never feel the same again.

Now that you have the basics for hosting an outdoor movie night, it’s time to get the invites out and start planning the menu. Here’s a recipe for Green Chicken Souvlaki Kabobs that’s sure to please. See our recipes for more ideas.

Print Recipe
Greek Chicken Souvlaki Kabobs
hungry for truth sd South Dakota farming agriculture gmo non gmo recipes easy chicken kabobs tasty family activities outdoor family activities outdoor movie night how to
Course Main Dish
Servings
Ingredients
The kabobs
  • 4 large chicken breasts
  • 1 Red Onion chopped into large pieces
  • 10 ounces grape or cherry tomatoes
  • kabob skewers
The marinade
  • 3 lemons
  • 1/3 cup Olive Oil
  • 4 tbsp fresh dill
  • 2 tbsp dried oregano
  • fresh ground pepper to taste
Course Main Dish
Servings
Ingredients
The kabobs
  • 4 large chicken breasts
  • 1 Red Onion chopped into large pieces
  • 10 ounces grape or cherry tomatoes
  • kabob skewers
The marinade
  • 3 lemons
  • 1/3 cup Olive Oil
  • 4 tbsp fresh dill
  • 2 tbsp dried oregano
  • fresh ground pepper to taste
hungry for truth sd South Dakota farming agriculture gmo non gmo recipes easy chicken kabobs tasty family activities outdoor family activities outdoor movie night how to
Instructions
  1. Cut lemons in half and squeeze juice into medium-sized container.
  2. Mix in olive oil, fresh dill, oregano and pepper. Set aside.
  3. Cube chicken breasts into large chunks for kabobs.
  4. Marinate chicken in lemon and olive oil mixture overnight or for 6-8 hours prior to serving.
  5. If using wooden kabob sticks, soak in water for about one hour prior to assembling kabobs.
  6. Assemble kabobs alternating between chicken, onion and tomatoes.
  7. Grill on medium heat until internal temperature of chicken reaches 165 degrees F.
  8. Flip kabobs halfway through grilling. Roughly 4-6 minutes per side. Enjoy!