Tag Archives: David Struck

Hungry for Truth Farm to Fork Dinner 2018

Our Top Five Stories From 2018

Cheers to another great year of farm visits, conversations and digging into the truth behind how food is grown and raised in South Dakota! Thank you for joining us on this journey. There are just so many fun things to discover while making the farm-to-table connection.

Hungry for Truth Farm to Fork Dinner 2018

Before we say sayonara to 2018, we’re taking one last look back at five of our top stories and recipes of 2018. Read on to see if yours made the list.

 

5. The Sustainability Story of a Fifth-Generation Farm

Since 1896, David Struck’s family has been farming and caring for their land in Wolsey, South Dakota. Today, three generations work together to grow soybeans, corn and wheat. The best part is, they aren’t alone! About 98 percent of farms in our state are still family owned and operated. “There’s a perception that we’re running big corporate farms out here that don’t care about the environment or about people, but that’s very untrue,” said David. Read more.

Hungry for Truth Sustainable Story of a Fifth Generation Farm David Struck

4. Cozy Up with Oksana Silchuk & Potato Chicken Noodle Soup

Nothing warms the soul on a chilly day like a bowl of homemade potato chicken noodle soup. Our fans loved snuggling up with Oksana Silchuk as she channeled her Ukrainian roots to create her favorite comfort food. Along the way, she shared her gratitude for initiatives like Hungry for Truth, which keeps her connected to farmers who grow and raise food her family and yours. Warm up with the recipe.

Hungry for Truth Oksana Silchuk Homemade Potato Chicken Noodle Soup Recipe

3. Crockpot Beef Bourguignon for Moms on the Go

Looking for a recipe that tastes homemade and doesn’t require a ton of prep? Courtney Hansen, South Dakota cattle farmer and mother of two, has you covered. When she isn’t helping her husband with calving, she’s making quick and easy meals like crockpot beef bourguignon. Read more about her farm and get the recipe to make your family dinner in a snap.

Hungry for Truth Crockpot Beef Bourguignon Recipe

2. Farm-to-Fork Dinner Unites Rural & Urban South Dakotans in Conversations Around the Table

We love getting farmers and families together to talk about important topics like farm sustainability, pesticide use and food safety. It’s even better when it happens around the table. This past summer, 180 South Dakotans joined us at the Country Apple Orchard near Sioux Falls for our third annual Farm-to-Fork dinner to learn the truth about what happens on today’s farms. Get the scoop on conversations, delicious local foods and what attendees learned.

Hungry for Truth Farm to Fork Dinner 2018

1. Millennial Farmer Goes High-Tech For Sustainability

In our top story, we explored how young farmers are using their college degrees and love of technology to transform their farms. Morgan Holler is just one of several millennial farmers who is leveraging data and adopting technology to make his family business more sustainable for the future. Find out how he’s growing food safely to feed his family and yours.

hungry for truth gmo sustainability young farmer practices family farms agriculture

Those are just a few of the adventures we had in 2018. Look for answers to your questions and find more recipes. Start your new year off right by signing up for our e-newsletter. It’s an easy way to get new stories and recipes delivered to your inbox each month.

Hungry for Truth is an initiative about food and farming funded by the South Dakota soybean checkoff. The goal is to connect South Dakotans with the farmers who grow and raise their food.

 

Sustainability is key for South Dakota farmer and Hungry for Truth advocate David Struck.

The Sustainability Story of a Five-Generation Farm

Since 1896, David Struck’s family has been farming and caring for their land in Wolsey, South Dakota. Today, three generations of the family work together to grow soybeans, corn and wheat. While their roots run deep in the Beadle County soil, the family has adopted new technology over the years, allowing them to become more efficient and sustainable.

 

Sustainability is key for South Dakota farmer and Hungry for Truth advocate David Struck.

 

For South Dakota soybean farmers, sustainability means doing what’s best for the environment and continuously improving the land for future generations. 

 

Sustainability is key for South Dakota farmer and Hungry for Truth advocate David Struck.

David has played an active role in implementing new strategies to farm smarter, faster and more efficiently along the way. His son, Brady, is the fifth generation to be actively involved and brings a fresh perspective to the farm as a recent graduate of Lake Area Technical Institute.

 

“We do more in an hour than my grandpa did in a season, and we do more in a day than my dad did in a season when he started farming,” said David. “It’s almost hard to fathom, looking back and seeing how far farming has come.”

 

Sustainability is key for South Dakota farmer and Hungry for Truth advocate David Struck.

 

For example, GPS technology completely changed the game for the Strucks, allowing them to farm with precision. Flat rate application of pesticides and fertilizers is a thing of the past on this farm. Instead, they tailor how much they apply as they move throughout their fields to make sure they use the exact amount needed. GPS technology has also saved them time and labor.

 

“We used to have two guys constantly circling the farm in pick-ups to monitor irrigation systems and look for anything that could be wrong,” said David. “Now, with GPS, we can monitor them from the office.”

 

Sustainability is key for South Dakota farmer and Hungry for Truth advocate David Struck.

 

The Struck family also plants cover crops to protect their land. This emerging trend allows farmers to manage nutrients and weeds by planting crops like rye, barley or even radishes and turnips, to capture nutrients and moisture, and to keep the soil in place.

 

Sustainability is key for South Dakota farmer and Hungry for Truth advocate David Struck.

 

The Strucks also use no-till farming, which means they don’t disrupt the soil by plowing between plantings. Instead, they leave the stalks and roots where they are after harvest, and the leftover organic matter sticks around to enrich the soil and help retain moisture. Capturing as much water as possible is important to the Strucks since they farm in a dry region.  

 

Sustainability is key for South Dakota farmer and Hungry for Truth advocate David Struck.

 

Speaking of moisture, they even use special irrigation technology called drop nozzles to reduce the amount of water lost to evaporation. In fact, their evaporation rate is less than a third of what it was 30 years ago.

These strategies may not have been used by David’s great-grandpa when the farm was established, but by embracing change and innovation, the family has grown safe and healthy crops for more than 120 years.

 

Sustainability is key for South Dakota farmer and Hungry for Truth advocate David Struck.

 

“There’s a perception that we’re running big corporate farms out here, that don’t care about the environment or about people, but that’s very untrue,” said David. “There are some big farms, but they’re still family farms with multiple generations involved in every one of them.”

In South Dakota, 98 percent of farms are family owned, and over 2,500 of those have been in the same family for more than a century. While the Strucks have expanded their farm throughout the years, it has always remained a family affair.  

 

Sustainability is key for South Dakota farmer and Hungry for Truth advocate David Struck.

 

“We’re very family oriented out here,” said David. “Are we big? Yes. It’s different than it was 100 years ago, but we’re still family farms, not giant, faceless corporations.”

 

Hungry for Truth is an initiative about food and farming funded by the South Dakota soybean checkoff. The goal is to connect South Dakotans with the farmers who grow and raise their food.