Tag Archives: crops

Hungry for Truth Pesticides and Food Safety

The Crop Protection and Food Safety Connection

Curious about how pesticides used on the farm translate to the grocery aisles? We recently talked with weed scientist Dr. David Shaw for answers to the top questions South Dakota soybean farmers are asked at Hungry for Truth events and online.

Dr. Shaw is a distinguished professor and vice president of research and economic development at Mississippi State University. He has served as president of the Weed Science Society of America and chair of a USDA task force that developed a report on herbicide resistance management. He’s also a father who enjoys cooking with his family and cheering on the Cardinals at Busch Stadium.

 

Hungry for Truth Pesticides and Food Safety Dr. David Shaw

 

Q: Will the pesticides used on the produce I buy harm me or my family?

 

A: There are a lot of regulatory and safety requirements that must be met before any pesticide can be used. The testing process is rigorous and designed to protect consumers first. Having looked at the science behind the approval process, I can say I have a great deal of confidence in the pesticide requirements from both the EPA and FDA. As a father looking out for my children, I want to be absolutely certain what I’m buying is safe.

 

Hungry for Truth Pesticides and Food Safety

 

Q: Isn’t it possible there are traces of pesticides on the produce I buy?

 

A: Just because a substance is detectable doesn’t necessarily mean it will cause any harm. The exposure limits that are set on pesticides are very conservative and are far lower than the levels that could actually put you in danger.

Have you ever looked into how much produce you’d have to eat to feel the effects of pesticides? Try this calculator. You might be surprised at the results.

 

Hungry for Truth Pesticides and Food Safety

Q: What are farmers doing today to reduce their use of pesticides in the fields?

 

A: Well, farmers use pesticides alongside other pest management practices like crop rotation, cover crops, promotion of beneficial insects and more. Each method is part of a toolkit to safely manage and grow healthy crops. Many farmers take a holistic approach to stopping pests.

 

Hungry for Truth Pesticides and Food Safety Dr. David Shaw

Q: Is organic farming better when it comes to pesticide use?

 

A: I have no argument against organic production, and it does have its own niche. But to be able to produce both the quantity and quality of food necessary to feed our growing population, organic production alone is not enough. I’d encourage folks to go out and spend a bit of time on an organic farm to really understand all the challenges and limitations these farmers face. This means everything from managing insects to maintaining a staff large enough to provide all the hand-weeding required to eliminate pesticide use. It’s a lot of challenging work. To be able to feed all the people in our world, we really need farms of all sizes.

People also have a misconception that organic farmers do not use pesticides. They do, and just like synthetic pesticides, some of these organic pesticides can be toxic if not used correctly. The key with both organic and synthetic pesticides is to use the products correctly according to their labels and then no one’s health will be threatened.

 

Still have questions about pesticides and food safety? Leave them in the comments below and we’ll help you find an answer. Whether you’re wondering how much pesticides farmers apply to South Dakota staple crops like soybeans or if you should worry about eating fresh produce from the grocery store, Hungry for Truth strives to help get you the facts from local farmers who have your family’s health in mind.

Hungry for Truth Crop Nutrients + Farm Sustainability

Fueling Your Food: How Farmers Sustainably Use Crop Nutrients To Grow Healthy Plants

If you’ve ever helped your kids with their science homework or cared for a plant, you might think that crops just need soil, water and sunlight to survive. While true, it turns out they really thrive with 17 essential elements. Three come from air and water, while the rest are absorbed through the soil.

That’s why fertilizers play such an essential role in farming. They provide the elements needed to grow healthy plants in the field. South Dakota farmers understand the balance and use technology to apply the nutrients in sustainable ways. Let’s explore three of the foundational elements, how they contribute to plant health and what technology farmers use to protect and improve the environment.

Nitrogen

Nitrogen is considered the most important element for growing healthy plants. It’s essential to creating protein, helping plants grow and it accounts for 80 percent of the air we breathe. Nitrogen is a big contributor to making food nutritious.

Unlike corn and wheat, soybeans create their own nitrogen. Soybeans and other legume crops have a special ability to transfer nitrogen from the air to the soil. Just like you might use a probiotic to improve your digestion, soybeans work with bacteria in the soil to convert nitrogen into the fuel they need to grow. For crops that can’t create their own, farmers apply nitrogen fertilizer in the form of a liquid, solid or gas.

Phosphorous

This element helps plants use and store energy. It also aids in photosynthesis and contributes to normal development. The phosphorus used in most farm fertilizers comes from phosphate rock, but it can also come in a liquid form.

Potassium

Potassium helps plants resist diseases, activates enzymes and improves its overall quality. It also protects the crop in cold or dry weather and helps to build a strong root system. Potassium is typically applied as a solid.

Hungry for Truth Crop Nutrients + Farm Sustainability

Sustainable Applications

How do farmers know how much of which nutrients they need to use to grow corn, soybeans and other crops? Through the results of research conducted by scientists at universities and ag businesses. Many farmers work with local experts who help them take soil samples from their fields, analyze the results, recommend products and create digital soil maps.

Farmers load those maps into the software in their tractors and precisely apply the right mix of nutrients per crop, per acre. This helps them minimize waste and fuels a healthy growing season. It also means they’re making continuous improvements on their family farms to do what’s right for the environment. Leaving the land in better condition for future generations.

Who knew farmers had to pay so much attention to chemistry and the environment? Here’s a look at more farm technology that helps John Horter be sustainable in the field.

Farm Sustainability Hungry for Truth South Dakota

The Truth Behind Five Farm Sustainability Myths

Being environmentally friendly is an important part of today’s family farms. Thanks to advancements in technology, adoption of conservation tillage and other factors, more than 90 percent of U.S. soybeans are grown sustainably. Most South Dakota families may not realize how much farmers focus on making improvements to care for the land and water, while growing healthy food, because it happens behind the scenes.

Think you know the truth about farms and sustainability? Test your knowledge below with five common myths and the truth behind them.

 

Myth: Farmers are becoming less sustainable.

Farm Sustainability Hungry for Truth South Dakota

TRUTH
Au contraire, farmers are becoming more sustainable. The U.S. Farmers and Ranchers Alliance estimates soybean farmers today are growing nearly 50 percent more soybeans now than just 30 years ago with a third of the water and energy and just under half the land. They’ve also cut greenhouse gas production and soil loss by nearly half.

 

Myth: Only small, organic farms are sustainable.

Farm Sustainability Hungry for Truth South Dakota

TRUTH
When it comes to sustainability, size really doesn’t matter. It’s all about making smart choices for the land and water. For example, the tillage that some organic and conventional farmers do to avoid using pesticides and create a good seedbed can disrupt soil health. Reducing tillage is something family farms of all sizes and practices can do to be more environmentally-friendly.

 

Myth: GMOs are not sustainable.

Farm Sustainability Hungry for Truth South Dakota

TRUTH
GMO seeds allow farmers to grow safe crops that are more resistant to certain pests, diseases and environmental conditions than plants grown from traditional seeds. Because GMO crops are better at defending themselves, farmers can use fewer pesticides. The American Council on Science and Health estimates GMO soybeans have helped reduce pesticide use by 37 percent.

 

Myth: Pesticides are not sustainable.

Farm Sustainability Hungry for Truth South Dakota

TRUTH
Pesticides are used by many farmers, organic and conventional alike. When used responsibly, they help protect crops from devastating pests. South Dakota soybean farmers must be educated and certified to mix and apply pesticides. They also use technology and equipment to ensure they’re using just the right amount to get the job done.

 

Myth: Sustainability is about choosing the environment over people.

TRUTH
Sustainability is all about making the right environmental choices now so families continue to enjoy safe and healthy food in the future. It’s choosing the environment and people. For South Dakota farmers, families are the key reason to protect the land and water for the future.

So how did your knowledge stack up against the facts? Let us know by leaving a comment below. Continue learning how South Dakota farmers go green by reading this story about a farmer near Colton.

hungry for truth sd South Dakota farming agriculture gmo non gmo recipes easy chicken kabobs tasty family activities outdoor family activities outdoor movie night how to

How to Host an Outdoor Movie Night + Greek Chicken Kabobs

Whether it’s date night at the theater or a cozy family night on the couch, movies have a way of bringing us together. When it’s warm in South Dakota, it can be fun to take the movie magic outdoors and gather under the stars. Here are our tips for planning a night that’s sure to please family and friends.

Hungry for Truth Outdoor Movie Night

 

Easy Essentials

A projector, audio speakers and computer are essential technology. A free projector might be tough to track down, but they are available at most rental companies and easy to purchase. Need a portable screen? No worries. Just hang a white sheet or painter’s drop cloth. You could also skip it and project onto the side of a building if it’s clean and light colored. Don’t forget extension cords.

Sunset Savvy

Pay attention to sunset and plan your festivities accordingly. You want to start the movie when it’s dark, so this could be 9 p.m. or 7:30 p.m., depending on the time of year. Starting later gives you time to host dinner and play yard games. Starting early may mean you can squeeze in two movies; family-friendly first for the kiddos and then one for the adults after they go to bed.

Comfy and Cozy

Keep your audience comfy by providing blankets and pillows for lounging or ask them to bring their own. Hang bistro lights to set the mood, segment food from the theater seating and make sure your guests can see where they’re going. Set out mosquito repellent spray and fire up citronella candles to protect your guests against bugs and other pests.

Snack Stylishly  

The best part of any movie night is the food. Snack stylishly by creating a buffet table out of pallets or cement blocks and plywood. Cover with a cute tablecloth and add a flower centerpiece for a touch of greenery.

When it comes to the menu, keep it simple. Finger foods like kabobs or meats and cheeses paired with crackers work well for flexible dining. A popcorn bar with butter and assorted toppings transforms the traditional snack into a bold, salty or tangy mix. If you’re in the mood for something sweet, a selection of classic movie candies or toasty s’mores are two of our favorites. In fact, we have the perfect recipe for campfire ice cream s’mores.

No matter what’s on the menu, South Dakota soybean farmers have you covered. Pigs, cows, chickens and turkeys love to eat protein-packed soybeans as part of a balanced diet. Healthy animals mean you’re serving up quality milk, eggs, cheese and meats for your guests.

Movie Magic

Select your movie based on your guest list. The classics or a comedy are always a great bet. Depending on who’s there, it might be “Grease,” “8 Seconds” or “The Goonies.” When it comes to kids, you can’t go wrong with anything Pixar or Disney. “Jurassic Park” or “Jaws” might be fun if you’re feeling adventurous, but watch out. Your backyard may never feel the same again.

Now that you have the basics for hosting an outdoor movie night, it’s time to get the invites out and start planning the menu. Here’s a recipe for Green Chicken Souvlaki Kabobs that’s sure to please. See our recipes for more ideas.

Print Recipe
Greek Chicken Souvlaki Kabobs
hungry for truth sd South Dakota farming agriculture gmo non gmo recipes easy chicken kabobs tasty family activities outdoor family activities outdoor movie night how to
Course Main Dish
Servings
Ingredients
The kabobs
  • 4 large chicken breasts
  • 1 Red Onion chopped into large pieces
  • 10 ounces grape or cherry tomatoes
  • kabob skewers
The marinade
  • 3 lemons
  • 1/3 cup Olive Oil
  • 4 tbsp fresh dill
  • 2 tbsp dried oregano
  • fresh ground pepper to taste
Course Main Dish
Servings
Ingredients
The kabobs
  • 4 large chicken breasts
  • 1 Red Onion chopped into large pieces
  • 10 ounces grape or cherry tomatoes
  • kabob skewers
The marinade
  • 3 lemons
  • 1/3 cup Olive Oil
  • 4 tbsp fresh dill
  • 2 tbsp dried oregano
  • fresh ground pepper to taste
hungry for truth sd South Dakota farming agriculture gmo non gmo recipes easy chicken kabobs tasty family activities outdoor family activities outdoor movie night how to
Instructions
  1. Cut lemons in half and squeeze juice into medium-sized container.
  2. Mix in olive oil, fresh dill, oregano and pepper. Set aside.
  3. Cube chicken breasts into large chunks for kabobs.
  4. Marinate chicken in lemon and olive oil mixture overnight or for 6-8 hours prior to serving.
  5. If using wooden kabob sticks, soak in water for about one hour prior to assembling kabobs.
  6. Assemble kabobs alternating between chicken, onion and tomatoes.
  7. Grill on medium heat until internal temperature of chicken reaches 165 degrees F.
  8. Flip kabobs halfway through grilling. Roughly 4-6 minutes per side. Enjoy!