Eunice the Iris Lady Blends Tradition With Technology on Her South Dakota Farm

Not many farmers can say they’ve cultivated their South Dakota land for nearly 90 years. But then again, Eunice McGee of rural Colton isn’t your typical farmer. Affectionately known by her friends and neighbors as the “Iris Lady,” Eunice not only tends a flower garden with 140 varieties of rare irises, she’s also pretty good at growing corn and soybeans on her family farm.


“I’ve been farming since I was 10 years old. I used to drive a team of horses alongside a one-row corn picker with my father. I’d stay with the wagon until it was full,” said Eunice, who turns 97 later this year. “Now I use my iPhone to check the farm markets to decide when to sell my crops. I think I’ve seen more changes in farming than anyone else around here. We just continue improving.”

With her eyes on the future and her knowledge of the past, Eunice embraces farm technology and new practices while staying committed to being a good neighbor and growing safe and healthy crops.

 

Though it was hard to give up the horses, she was the first woman in her area to purchase her own tractor, a move that caught the banker off guard. She also began planting GMO corn and soybean seeds when the technology became available because they require less water and pesticides to protect the plants. She said that, despite all the changes she’s seen in farming, she still feels safe eating food that’s grown and raised on farms.

Today, her son-in-law Tom Langrehr and neighbor Dan Fladmark tend to the day-to-day field work while her daughter Deb Langrehr takes care of the bookkeeping. Eunice actively maintains massive gardens of irises, tulips and day lilies, delivers equipment parts to the field and is the key decision-maker when it comes to managing the farm. Her neighbor, Jeff Thompson, enjoys stopping in to see the flowers, finding out how her crops look and discussing market trends, which Eunice has at her fingertips.

 

Every year, she determines which seeds to plant, where to plant them and when to sell her crops. She also works with the local co-op to spray pesticides when needed and harvest her soybeans and corn because she doesn’t own a combine. There’s no doubt farming is in her blood, and she has her grandfather Lars to thank for it.

Lars Berven came to the United States from Norway in the late 1800s with hopes of finding land and starting a family. After a brief time in Wisconsin, he headed west and settled on 160 acres in Sioux territory. All he had to do was plant crops and tend to them for a year and the land would be his for free. The natives were friendly and eventually named the farm Minnewawa Farm after the “gentle waters” that flowed in a nearby creek. That was 1875.

 

By the time Eunice came along in 1920, her father had taken over the family farm and grown it to 320 acres. She farmed alongside her grandfather and father as they expanded to the 805 acres she manages today. When she got married to her late husband JC in 1943, they moved to a new farm just two and a half miles away. In addition to growing crops, she also raised chickens for eggs and maintained a garden full of vegetables over the years.

“I just love being outside,” said Eunice. “Farming gives me the opportunity to be outdoors with the animals and nature.”

Another thing she loves to do is cook meals from scratch to feed the combine crew who harvests her crops. Typically, the crew pushes through harvest without breaks, but not on Eunice’s farm. She gets them out of the field with mashed potatoes and gravy and sends them home with their favorite pies.

“The world is so fast paced these days. On our farm, we take meal breaks to slow down a bit, enjoy our blessings and talk to each other,” said Eunice. We couldn’t agree more. Conversations around the dinner table are one thing that should never go out of style.

Enjoy reading stories about real South Dakota farmers? Here are a few we think you’ll like:

Keeping South Dakota Waters Clean is Good for Summer Fun and Farming

The Rise of the Small-Scale Millennial Farmer

Cooking and Family are the Center of This South Dakota Farm

9 thoughts on “Eunice the Iris Lady Blends Tradition With Technology on Her South Dakota Farm

  1. I wish this would somehow be shared with Eunice! My name is Tom Higby and I have fond memories of JC and Eunice. She is an awesome lady, as was her late husband JC an awesome gentleman.

  2. Thank you for featuring Eunice in your publication. She epitomizes all of the beauty and hard work that comes from family farm life. She is a wonderful lady and has been a great neighbor and friend to my family, the McMahons. The article was very well deserved.

  3. We have some transplants of Eunice Iris in our flower garden. We have always enjoyed Eunice and family. My mother Goldie Berven Gray and Eunice were special friends and Eunice is a special friend – not just a relative!
    Dennis and Marilyn Gray

  4. What a great write up. Sure would love to meet her, not only to visit with her about gardening but would love to see her Iris. I really like Iris also

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